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Office workers ‘do not get to see daylight in the week’

ServicedofficeBENews801510328

Up to half of all British office workers only see daylight during their lunch break as we reach the depths of winter.

This is the finding of a new study commissioned by Beurer, which revealed that many people are now full-time ‘night owls’.

The firm discovered that – with the sun rising at 08:00 GMT and setting at around 16:00 – some workers are only seeing the sun on weekends.

Half of all employees surveyed said they take a lunch hour purely to see a bit of daylight, given that the sun will have gone down by the time they finish work.

However, the remainder said they are usually too busy to take a midday break – offering insight into the pressure employees are under in the workplace.

Robert Slade of Beurer said that once the clocks go back at the end of October, the dark nights really start to take effect.

”If you leave for work relatively early then the chances are your mornings are dark too, which means you don’t get time outdoors as part of your job, then you are likely to see very little daylight at all during the week,” he stated.

”That in itself can be very depressing and it’s inevitable that long dark days will have an effect on our moods.”

Some 52 per cent of Brits surveyed by Beurer said they would happily go into hibernation until the spring, when the clocks go forward.

Mr Slade said there is nothing people can do to change the gloomy weather so often seen in British winter time.

But he suggested people should be looking to make the best of the situation by embracing cosy nights in.

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